2012 Thursday Workshops

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2012 Thursday Workshops

Workshop Schedule with Descriptions

All sessions will take place at the Rhode Island Convention Center, easily accessed by a skybridge from our host hotel, The Westin Providence. When you enter the Center from the skybridge you will be on the Third Level where you will find the HLAA Convention Registration Desk and our Exhibit Hall (Hall C). Workshops and large sessions, along with the Demo Room, will be located on the Fifth Level. Workshops are grouped by “education track” (or topic). The four education tracks for Convention 2012 are:

  • Advocacy  (Room: 550 AB)
  • Assistive & Other Technology  (Room: 551 AB)
  • Hearing Aids & Cochlear Implants  (Room: 552 AB)
  • Relationships & Communication  (Room: 553 AB)


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1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.


Positive Self Advocacy and Career Success

Room: 550 AB

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Presenter:
David Baldridge, Ph.D., Management Team Director, Newcomb Fellow and Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, Oregon State University

Summary:
This workshop will help participants better understand common problems that people who have hearing loss experience in the workplace and learn best practices for overcoming these problems. In particular, strategies for managing supervisors and coworkers, as well as, how to self-advocate without increasing isolation or resentment will be discussed. Dr. Baldridge will present non-technical portions of his research on both accommodation and career success. The overarching goal is to help attendees pursue career success and satisfaction.

Dr. Baldridge’s research on hearing loss accommodation requests suggests that people with hearing loss often do not request the accommodation they need. Negative assessments regarding the normative appropriateness of making a particular accommodation request and concerns that a supervisor will not comply if a request have been shown to increase the likeliness that request for needed accommodation will be withheld. Drawing on workplace disability, help-seeking, social identity and organizational climate literature, his most recent study proposes and tests a model of disabled employee’s assessments regarding the anticipated supervisory compliance using survey data from 279 people with hearing loss. Consistent with expectations, notfor-profit organizations were perceived as more supportive of disabilities, workgroup disability supportiveness positively affected the perception of an accommodation being granted, and perceptions regarding normative appropriateness partially mediated this relationship. Furthermore, the relationship between workgroup disability supportiveness and normative appropriateness was stronger for older individuals than younger individuals and the relationship between normative appropriateness and anticipated supervisory compliance was weaker for those individuals with an earlier age of disability onset. Implications for management research and practice are discussed.

Dr. Baldridge’s ongoing study of hearing loss and career success sheds light on how hearing loss impacts workplace integration, isolation and career outcomes. While social and institutional isolation have been identified as potential barriers to equal employment for minority groups, people with disabilities often face additional barriers inherent to the nature of their disability. To that end, the study helps illuminate dynamics related to workplace isolation by investigating attitudes toward disability in general—hearing loss in particular—and accommodation. Data has been collected from people with hearing loss, their supervisor and their coworkers that helps better explain how hearing loss impacts social and professional isolation as well as career outcomes, and the role that workgroup factors play in moderating these outcomes.

Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish: Top Considerations When Purchasing Hearing Technology

Room: 551 AB

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Presenters:
Stephanie Sjoblad, Au.D., Clinical Coordinator for the UNC Hearing and Communication Center and Associate Professor for University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences. Dr. Sjoblad is a life-long user of hearing instrument technology.

Barbara Winslow Warren, Au.D., audiologist at the UNC Hearing and Communication Center and Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education in the Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Summary:
Audiologists began dispensing hearing aids after a retail pricing structure was already established by hearing instrument dispensers. Rather than change the pricing model to reflect both fees for the services provided by the practitioner and cost of goods, many audiologists continued to bundle all their services into the price of the hearing aids. Almost thirty years since audiologists began dispensing, consumers remain ill-informed about the benefits and value of working with a hearing healthcare professional who utilizes evidence-based practice when purchasing hearing aids.As manufacturers continue to perfect their products and design hearing instruments to be more ‘automatic and easy to fit’ consumers are being lured by other distribution channels that may not be in their best interest. Some hearing healthcare providers are beginning to itemize their billing to help consumers understand that there is more to a proper hearing aid fitting than simply plugging audiogram results into a computer to program hearing aids or receiving pre-programmed devices in the mail.

Other professionals, such as dentistry, podiatry, and optometry, often provide a product as part of their treatment plans. These professionals charge fees for services rendered, in addition to fees for the goods purchased. Audiologists have guidelines from the American Academy of Audiology Task Force regarding the Management of Adult Hearing Loss. If hearing healthcare providers utilize these guidelines in their fitting protocol, they have ample opportunities to establish value while ensuring patient satisfaction during the hearing aid fitting process. From performing Electro-acoustic analysis on all hearing aids, and utilizing Real-Ear Measures when fitting and fine tuning hearing aids to validation and audiologic rehabilitation services following hearing fitting, valuable services are provided.

A Rehabilitative Approach to Device Programming

Room: 552 AB

Presenters:
Kristin Vasil-Dilaj, Ph.D., audiologist at the New England Center for Hearing Rehabilitation

Diane Brackett, Ph.D., Speech-Language Pathologist at the New England Center for Hearing Rehabilitation

Jessica Hasbrouck, MA, Speech-Language Pathologist at the New England Center for Hearing Rehabilitation

Summary:
Cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid (HA) technology has allowed us to differentially program devices according to the needs to the user. A “one size fits all” approach to programming does not lead to satisfaction for the listener or their family members. The goals of programming devices change over time based upon auditory skill level and the demands of social and academic environments. This session will focus on how programming satisfaction changes from first fitting as an infant to adulthood. The demands of language learning, academic environments, and social environments will be discussed. In addition, patients and parents will become familiar with how to communicate Mapping/Programming needs to their audiologist.

How to Understand a Child When You Can’t Hear Them: Tips from a Lipreading Mom

Room: 553 AB

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Presenter:
Jennifer Thorpe, Trainer/Installer/Marketing with CaptionCall; mother of five children

Summary:
Lipreading mom, Jennifer Thorpe, takes an honest, heartfelt, and occasionally humorous look at the challenges of raising children when Mommy can’t hear. With five children, she has a wealth of hard-earned experiences and practical advice to share. Deafness can make “the hardest job you’ll ever love” even more difficult, but support and tips from a mom who has been there can help!

3 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.


Bringing CART to Your Community

Room: 550 AB

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Presenters:
Kate Kanies, coordinator for the Regional Intervention Program of the Tennessee Department of Mental Health (TDMH) and president of the HLAA Nashville Chapter

Karyn D. Menck, RDR, RMR, CRR, CBC, CCP, CART/Captioner; also serves on the Executive Board of Directors, HLAA Nashville Chapter

Summary:
Speakers describe an ongoing advocacy project of HLAA Nashville Chapter, introducing basic CART/captioning technology to community venues, including live theatre, leisure (1) educate the community about CART/captioning and communication needs of people with hearing loss; (2) identify grant resources and obtain funding to purchase LED technology, and; (3) collaborate with community venues to offer CART/captioning services on a free, one-time, trial basis.

Wireless Industry: Finding the Cell Phones or Mobile Devices to Meet Your Needs

Room: 551 AB

NOTE: This workshop will run until 5 p.m.

Moderator:
Matthew Gerst, Esq., Counsel, External and State Affairs, CTIA-The Wireless Association®

Summary:
The Wireless Industry: Finding the Cell Phones or Mobile Devices To Meet Your Needs provides an overview of the latest developments in wireless devices and services for individuals with a hearing loss who are students, professionals or young at heart. If you want to know more about how hearing aid compatibility (“HAC”) with wireless handsets and innovative mobile services can open or enhance employment, education and personal communication opportunities, this panel is for you. NOTE: Industry representatives will be on-hand to answer questions for 45 minutes after the session.

Hearing Aid Manufacturers Panel

Room: 552 AB

Moderator:
Brad Ingrao, Au.D.

Summary:
Hearing aid manufacturers that also exhibit at Convention 2012 will be invited to participate on this panel to describe the latest technology and answer questions from attendees.

Marriage and Hearing Loss – Oh My!

Room: 553 AB

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Presenter:
Cathy Kooser, MSW, employed at Hillcrest Hearing Aids and Balance Center as a Licensed Independent Social Worker

Summary:
Marital relationships, even under ideal circumstances, take a lot of hard work, time, and commitment; without these ingredients, the likelihood of failure is quite high. Currently 50 percent of all first time marriages end in divorce and these are marriages in which the ability to communicate has not been compromised due to hearing loss. Add hearing loss, with no understanding of its impact or how to cope, and you have a recipe for marital disaster.