Winter 2021


Table of Contents

In this issue of Hearing Life, Allyson Welch explains how challenging it is to communicate as a mommy/daughter duo with hearing loss in Birds of a Feather—Better Together. In Hearing Dogs: What They Are and How to Get One, Allyson explains what an invaluable resource a hearing dog can be to help people who are deaf or have hearing loss. Kathi Mestayer explains the perils and pitfalls of technology and running meetings remotely in Telework: How’s That Working For You?  Katie Byxbe, a young teenager from Connecticut, explains how she has the superpower to shut out any or all sounds in My Life Beyond Hearing Aids. Michael Harvey encourages a patient to correspond with her doctor about her tinnitus via a fantasized conversation in Doctors, Please Care That There’s No Cure. In Plunged Into Silence, Gloria Raskin realized how lucky she was to having hearing aids after hers were zapped during an MRI procedure. And finally, musician Wendy Cheng shares her journey with hearing loss and pursuing a music degree in I Hear You, Beethoven. Want more? Become a member of HLAA. We want to show you that you’re not alone.

Birds of a Feather—Better Together

By Allyson T. Welch

The author shares how challenging it is to communicate as a mommy/daughter duo with hearing loss, and how despite their challenges, it has been a true blessing to have each other to get through it. 

Read Story

A Note From Our Executive Director

By Barbara Kelley

What Did We Learn?

Read Story

Thoughts From Our Board Chair

By Richard Einhorn

Good Morning! 

Health Care Communication Access

By Kevin H. Franck

The Time is Now

Read Story

Advocacy

By Lise Hamlin

Cochlear Implant International Community of Action (CIICA) 

Doctors, Please Care That There’s No Cure

By Michael A. Harvey

In a patient’s fantasized correspondence with her doctor about her tinnitus, he validates her suffering and assures her of continued care and she facilitates the lowering of his protective shield of compassion fatigue—a win-win outcome. 

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HLAA Chapters

By Carla Beyer-Smolin

Strong and Thriving!

I Hear You, Beethoven

By Wendy Cheng

When the author was a college freshman in the early 1980s, she wondered whether she could major in music. Her well-meaning college friends would say, “Well, Beethoven did it, and so can you.”

Telework: How’s That Working for You?

By Kathi Mestayer

Effective communication is crucial for running a business, and the tools and signals of remote meetings don’t always work perfectly. That makes technology a moving target that changes as new technologies and features make their debuts. 

Read Story

HLAA Corporate Partner Forum: Pipeline Therapeutics

By Stephen Huhn

Can hearing be restored? Pipeline Therapeutics thinks it’s worth a shot.

Book Nook

Review by Larry Herbert

Interference by Brad Parks 

My Life Beyond My Hearing Aids

By Katie Byxbee

Katie, a thirteen-year-old from Connecticut, explains how up until two years ago, she thought everyone had the superpower to shut out any or all sounds like she does. 

Walk4Hearing

By Walk Staff

The Walk4Hearing Brings Communities Together

Hearing Dogs: What They Are and How to Get One

By Allyson T. Welch

A hearing dog is a special assistance dog that is specifically trained to help people who are deaf or have hearing loss. They are capable of alerting their handler to sounds like doorbells, oven timers, smoke alarms, alarm clocks, ringing phones, and other important sounds.

Plunged Into Silence

By Gloria Raskin

The author never realized how lucky she was to have hearing aids to help her hear better and communicate with others until they were zapped during an MRI procedure.

Deafness is Not a Shame But a Fame

By Rizwana Jmari

A poem by Rizwana Jmari